Saint Clair Family Estate with Alison Downs – Oct 2020

Saint Clair Family Estate from Marlborough with Alison Downs
presenting.

Last month we had Saint Clair Family Estate from Marlborough with Alison Downs presenting.

This was an extremely well-presented evening and was enjoyed by all club members present – 40 of us!

It was interesting hearing Alison’s wine journey from the UK and Europe to the New World and her enduring wine passion and growing knowledge and experience.

The committee was unanimous in their agreement that Alison is probably the best presenter we have had in recent memory.

Our orders from the evening were substantial with people enjoying all the
wines presented, especially interesting to get to sample the Pinot Blanc, a new white grape for most.

  • 2019 Saint Clair Origin Pinot Gris Rosé
  • 2018 Saint Clair Pioneer Block 28 Pinot Blanc
  • 2019 Saint Clair Origin Hawke’s Bay Viognier
  • 2019 Saint Clair Wairau Reserve Sauvignon Blanc
  • 2019 Saint Clair James Sinclair Chardonnay
  • 2018 Saint Clair Pioneer Block 22 Pinot Noir
  • 2017 Saint Clair Origin Hawke’s Bay Merlot

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We Asked 12 Sommeliers: What’s One Trend in Wine You Wish Would Catch On?

Words: Ashlie Hughes & illustration: Gerry Selian | November 11, 2020, VinePair

llustration: Gerry Selian
illustration: Gerry Selian

Some drinking fads come and go, while others, such as rosé and the once-obscure but now ubiquitous orange wine, are here to stay. With the uncertainty that 2020 has unleashed on the beverage industry, accurately predicting the next wine craze is a daunting task.

To discover which trends could soon be in vogue, VinePair polled industry pros to find the wines and industry practices that they hope will soon gain traction. From an innovative American wine region to grape varieties and winemaking styles that deserve more attention, here are 12 trends that might be coming to a wine store or restaurant nearby.

Wine Trends Sommeliers Wish Would Catch On

  • Marsalas
  • Piquettes
  • Screw caps
  • Champagne
  • Trusting your instincts
  • Grosses Gewächs Dry Rieslings
  • Coffee shop wine bars
  • Selfie-less wine
  • North American hybrid grapes
  • Labels with technical data
  • Transparency
  • Rieslings

Keep reading for details about all the recommended trends to watch!

“I like seeing the youngsters drinking their red wines chilled — cold, even. I am [also] happy to see red sparklings gaining a little shelf and cooler space. The thing I have been pushing for the last two years is great Marsala as an indulgence, or a luxury item, instead of a common kitchen ingredient. Marsala belongs in a glass, not on a plate.” —Jeremy Allen, Beverage Director, Little Dom’s & MiniBar Hollywood, Los Angeles

“The making of Piquette. It’s a light, easy-drinking, low-ABV, slightly fizzy wine product made from the grape pomace macerated in water, and traditionally something served to vineyard workers during harvest.” —Damien del Rio, Owner, Sauced, Brooklyn

“I would like [to see] more screw caps and less cork. The sustainability of [the] screw cap is the way to go!” —Lenya Wilson, Level 2 WSET Sommelier, The Glenmark, Glendale, A Tribute Portfolio Hotel, Glendale, Calif.

“Drinking Champagne and sparkling wine for no reason at all.” —Rob Wecker, Master Sommelier and Owner, Bushel and a Peck Kitchen & Bar, Clarksville, Md.

“I wish people would learn to trust people — and their own palates — more than numbers or scores. Trust your instincts about what you like, rather than drinking what someone else thinks you should be drinking. … If you’re really interested in learning about all of the different wines and flavours that are out there, try to pick up at least one new bottle every time you shop for wine. Talk to the people who work at your wine store of choice, whether that’s the grocery store or your local wine shop. Tell them what you usually drink, and ask them to suggest something similar, but different, so you can try something new.” —Shawn Paul, Wine Operations Director, Foxcroft Wine Co., Charlotte, N.C. and Greenville, S.C.

“If there was one trend I wish would catch on, it’s using Grosses Gewächs (great growths) dry Rieslings on wine lists. These are super complex, pair with a range of foods, and, in my opinion, are better pairing wines than white Burgundies.” —Patrick Reno, Beverage Director, Luthun, NYC

“I noticed some new stores combining coffee shops and wine bars. I think those are perfect matches for mornings [that] then roll into a wine bar in the p.m. Both beverages [can be] enjoyed in that setting, doing some work or hanging with friends over some small plates. I think that setup makes wine bars more profitable and helps people learn, with the ability for service teams to talk to their guests. —Luke Kennedy, General Manager, Proper 21K, Washington, D.C.

“Drinking wine without posting a picture of the bottle. If three people drink a bottle of Clos Rougeard together, but no one posts a picture on Instagram, does it still count?” —Jordon Sipperley, Wine Director, Tidbits by Dialogue, Santa Monica, Calif.

“We are seeing a new generation of winemakers in New England experimenting with North American hybrid grapes (such as Frontenac Noir, Marquette, Brianna) — as [opposed] to the vitis vinifera grapes that we all know and love. Female winemaker Deirdre Heekin of La Garagista is a pioneering example of this.” —Kylie Monagan, Partner/Wine Director, Civetta Hospitality (Amali, Calissa, Bar Marseille), NYC and Water Mill, N.Y.

“More technical data detailed on the label. [I] love it when wineries provide information regarding the composition, oak regimen, vineyards, and name of winemaker, grape growers and/or cellar master.” —Scott Lester, Wine Director, Fellow, Los Angeles

“Transparency! By which I mean, simply, putting the ingredients of your wine on the label. It’s such a strange thing that the FDA requires nutritional labels for all packaged food, yet someone can make wine, manipulate it with all sorts of additives and chemicals, and call it Cabernet Sauvignon without listing what they actually put into it. A few wineries in Oregon have started listing their ingredients on the label as a movement to show that they only used organic grapes, for example, or perhaps they had to dilute with water, so the water becomes an ingredient. This is a movement about awareness. I think it is a long road to get people on track to really care, but if the wine industry were required to label all ingredients, that might change.” —Austin Bridges, Wine Director, Nostrana, Portland, Ore.

“I wish more people would be open to trying Rieslings. Many sommeliers and wine experts appreciate the qualities of a Riesling because it is such a unique and versatile wine that pairs with virtually any kind of food. … Rieslings offer a fresh new bouquet of flavour to the palate and are really quite, unlike any other wines. If you are ‘anti-sweetness,’ which is often associated with so many German Rieslings, stick with dry Rieslings from many New World countries or from Alsace. You will still get the flavour profile but much less sweetness — although sometimes the sweetness really helps when cooling down spicy foods.” —Piero Procida, Food & Beverage Director, The London West Hollywood at Beverly Hills, West Hollywood, Calif.

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F.A.W.C. [Food and Wine Classic] Night In – August 15th 2020

An exclusive evening of excellent wines, delicious canapés and fantastic banter beaming right into your living room
An exclusive evening of excellent wines, delicious canapés and fantastic banter beaming right into your living room

As COVID-19 has altered the way both businesses and functions operate NZ-wide this year and next, the Hawkes Bay’s Winter FAWC celebrations were altered too.

FAWC notified all their regular attendees of a new event which was ‘FAWC Night In’. This was to be for an hour, 5-6 pm, on Saturday 15th August.

‘Gather up to 10 of our friends for an exclusive evening of excellent wine, delicious canapes and fantastic banter beaming right into your living room.’

The cost for people joining in for the virtual wine tasting was $250.00 for the hamper that held the contents for the tasting – this included five bottles of wine and the ingredients for the carefully matched canapes from the iconic Hawkes’s Bay Farmers’ Market and suppliers.

‘To discover the flavours of each of the wines, why different varietals have excelled in the varied terrain of Hawke’s Bay and to enjoy the witty tete-a-tete from the industry insiders.’

Our hamper arrived the Thursday before the event, and we refrigerated what contents needed to be in anticipation of Saturday! Along with the zoom meeting invite for the event.

So, we had:

  • 5 x 75ml pours of wine
  • 5 x bite-sized canapes

We had a lot of fun with this new format being tried out by region’s leading wineries and winemakers, the getting together with friends and the sharing:

  • Richard Painter – Te Awa Estate 2020 Cabernet Franc Rose’ – matching canape Origin Earth Takenga Gold Cheese with Berry Bees Manuka Comb Honey
    Tasting: strawberries, almost sweet but not too much Visually: blush in colour Canape brought out the saltiness in the wine – a really interesting match
  • Amy Hopkinson-Styles – Halcyon Days Wines 2019 Kotare Sauvignon Blanc/Gewurztraminer – matching canape Nieuwenhuis Goats Cheese on crackers
    Tasting: smooth on the palate, not the usual green apple taste, but pleasantly gooseberry-ish; had a small measure of pinot noir and gertz combined in it! Was quite a savoury taste Visually: pale yellow Canape was a well-matched selection.
  • Matt Kirby – Clearview Estate 2019 Chardonnay – matching canape Pig & Salt Pork Rillettes, Preserve & Co. Peach Chutney on Hapi Paelo Bread
    Tasting: highly anticipated as the last time we had this one at the Club is was from the first batch in new American Oak and tasted strongly of coffee! This brew was completely different and most enjoyable. It smelled and tasted like a buttery chardonnay – vegan friendly! Hand-harvested from their own block and naturally fermented Canape was a nice compliment to the wine.
  • Michael Henley – Smith and Sheth 2017 CRU Heretaunga Syrah – matching canape Pig & Salt Lamb Terrine with Hapi Paleo Bread
    Tasting: dark berries came through with a smooth-dry-ish after taste on the tongue – this had been a difficult vintage in the Bay to work with, but this could successfully be cellared for 7 years Visually: lovely dark red Canape was a nice compliment.
  • Julianne Brogden – Collaboration Wines 2018 Cabernet Sauvignon – matching canape Hapi Harore Cheese with OMG Cracker
    Tasting: blackberries on the tongue, most pleasant, this wine is 100% Cab Sauv from two sites Bridge Pa and Gravels and the grape variety is the last to ripen in the Bay. It has had two years in oak barrels and was very pleasant while being more sophisticated than the old Cab Sauv’s we remembered! This can be cellared for 10-12 years Visually: dark red Canape didn’t really enhance the wine any but was pleasant.

This was a strictly limited ticket numbers event, but I think we all felt it could have been a bit longer, as we enjoyed it so much! Would definitely recommend any upcoming events to members.

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The Perfect Wine Pairing for Every Classic BBQ Dish

Betty Gold Updated June 29, 2020 | RealSimple

To get the scoop on the best way to bring your barbecue fare to life with wine
To get the scoop on the best way to bring your barbecue fare to life with wine

Picking wines that complement all of the tangy, salty, and sweet flavours of our favourite grilled foods can be a challenge. So many different types of palates to please! But before you throw in the towel and settle for a case of Bud Light and a few bottles of pinot grigio, we’re here to eliminate all of that intimidation. Seriously, you’ll be pairing burgers with Beaujolais like a sommelier just in time for the Fourth.

To get the scoop on the best way to bring your barbecue fare to life with wine, we consulted the experts at Vivino, the world’s largest online wine marketplace. Their vino pros helped us round up these recommendations for the top varietals for every type of grill fare. Whether you’re cooking pulled pork or tofu, we have something here that’ll sizzle harmoniously.

Hamburgers + Beaujolais

How to make the perfect burger. The Gentleman's Journal
How to make the perfect burger. The Gentleman’s Journal

Burgers are summer grilling staples, so it’s only fitting that they pair with the number one summer barbecue wine: Beaujolais. Light, fresh, and fun, Beaujolais is extremely food-friendly. Expect peppy red cherry and strawberry flavors with a touch of earthy undertones.

Hot Dogs + Rosé

Pedernales Cellars Viognier and Rosé are perfect with hot dogs
Pedernales Cellars Viognier and Rosé are perfect with hot dogs

The toppings make the hot dog, so the key is to find a wine versatile enough to pair with anything you can eat on a dog. It’s hard to go wrong with a dry rosé, but look for one with some character to it: minerality, acidity, or unique, savoury flavours.

Grilled Corn + Chardonnay

Sweet, salty, buttery grilled corn needs a wine that will accent—but not overwhelm—its flavours, which is why Chardonnay aged in steel or old oak is a natural match. Most unoaked Chardonnays still go through malolactic fermentation, which creates a creamy, buttery texture without oaky flavours of vanilla and baking spice (that would overwhelm the corn).

Grilled Seafood + Sicilian White

Rinazzu Etna Rosso Selezione Speciale
Rinazzu Etna Rosso Selezione Speciale

Embrace the essence of grilled seafood with a salty, zesty Sicilian white. Sicilian white wines, particularly those grown on the slopes of Mount Etna, have distinct volcanic minerality, lemon acidity, and a touch of salinity, which makes for an ocean-reminiscent flavour.

Grilled Tofu + Champagne

Vegetarians need barbecue options too, and creatively prepared tofu can be an excellent substitute for otherwise meat-heavy festivities. The bubbles in Champagne provide a nice contrast to the texture of tofu, while tart citrus flavours and focused acidity make it perfect for pairing with almost any flavour profile.

Pork Chops + Pinot Noir

Wine Pairings With Pork by Cut and Cuisine. LoveToKnow
Best Wine Pairings With Pork by Cut and Cuisine. LoveToKnow

Pork chops pair well with both red and white wine, but with a dry rub on the grill, red wine has the edge. Medium-bodied Pinot Noir from the Willamette Valley in Oregon has a little bit of everything that pork chops call for, flavour-wise, melding lush New World cherry cola-esque fruit with Old World earthiness.

North Carolina-Style Pulled Pork + Riesling

For a wine to stand up to North Carolina-style pulled pork’s vinegar-based sauce, two things are crucial: sugar and acid. Off-dry Riesling is the answer, with mouthwatering acidity and just a touch of residual sugar to keep the wine from seeming too austere.

Memphis-Style Pulled Pork + Zinfandel

Slightly sweeter than the North Carolina-style, smoky, spiced Memphis-style pulled pork calls for a wine with juicy, round fruit, like a classic California Zinfandel. While Zinfandel can be overly jammy and high-alcohol, the best examples balance body with acidity, allowing fresh red and blackberry fruit to burst onto the palate and complement the pork.

Ribs + Syrah

The full bodied intensity of Shiraz pairs well with fatty grilled meats like pork ribs, beef short rib, and sausages of all kinds. Joie de Vivre
The full-bodied intensity of Shiraz pairs well with fatty grilled meats like pork ribs, beef short rib, and sausages of all kinds. Joie de Vivre

For a knock-out baby back rib pairing, embrace the flavours that make ribs so good with a wine that carries them. Full of smoke, meat, and black peppery goodness, Syrah from the northern Rhône is right on the money—as if someone took the smoked ribs themselves and put them into the wine.

Steak + Cabernet Sauvignon

Matching steak and Napa Cab is a no-brainer, but to take the pairing to a new level, look up the mountain. Vineyards situated within the mountain ranges that form the Napa Valley—such as Spring Mountain District or Chiles Valley—have the added benefit of elevation, creating a more restrained and elegant style of wine.

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Confidant Wines August 2020 tasting

We are meeting as usual on 12 August at the Johnsonville Community Hall, Ground Floor for an 8 pm starts with Confidant Wines, a small (boutique) local importer of Portuguese wines in Wellington distributing the well-regarded Casa Santos Lima winery and a range of notable NZ wineries that are available in selected retail outlets and a number of Wellington restaurants.

Victor Kattenbelt has been around the Wellington wine scene for a number of years and travels to Europe every year (even early 2020), for wine trade expos in France, Netherlands and Germany, and to visit his suppliers in Portugal.

Victor’s Portuguese portfolio is extensive, and some of his wines this time round are new to his portfolio and we have decided to expand the tasting to 8 wines for the tasting to do justice to his wide range and to celebrate our European tasting country of the year.

If you are interested in doing more reading see Casa Santos Lima winery. The wines for the evening are:

  • A Portuguese bubble – Casa Santos Bruto [NV] to begin the evening
  • 2018 Galodoro Rose
  • 2016 VK Gewurztraminer (NZ)
  • 2018 Linden Estate Chardonnay (NZ)
  • Then an array of 4 unique Portuguese reds:
    • 2017 Bons Ventos
    • 2017 Confidencial Red
    • 2018 Valcatrina
    • and to finish a superb Alicante Bouschet premium red

The member door price will be $15 and guest price $18.

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Crater Rim Tasting Review Jun 2020

From the Ashes Range
Premium Range
Icon Range

39 members attended for the evening and orders for the wine & 5 cookbooks exceeded $3K which is one of our more successful orders.

An interesting note from our orders is that the 2019 Wairarapa Viognier was the preferred wine, with 2018 From the Ashes Riesling second. The Viognier also illustrates how they grow grapes and bottle wine from various areas around NZ, even though they are based in North Canterbury.

The list of wines we sampled during the evening for your recollection is below:

  • 2017 Waipara Sauvignon Blanc
  • 2018 From the Ashes Riesling
  • 2019 From the Ashes Pinot Gris
  • 2019 Waipara Viognier
  • 2018 Waipara Chardonnay
  • 2019 Waipara Rosé
  • 2019 From the Ashes Pinot Noir
  • 2015 Banks “Rata” Pinot Noir

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Guillaume Thomas and Esther Smith – Maison Noire – Feb 2020

A great presentation from Guillaume with assistance from Esther. There was a good turnout of members and Maison Noire was more than happy with the level of the orders. A little glitch with getting some orders to members, but this is about sorted now.

Guillaume Thomas and Esther Smith of Maison Noire - Feb 2020
Guillaume Thomas and Esther Smith of Maison Noire – Feb 2020

Guillaume has concentrated on bringing out those aspects of the wine that were very reminiscent of France & presented:

  • 2018 Maison Noire Rosé
  • 2019 Maison Noire Arneis
  • 2015 Maison Noire Sauvignon Blanc
  • 2018 Maison Noire Chardonnay
  • 2015 Maison Noire Cabernet Franc
  • 2016 Maison Noire Cabernet Merlot
  • 2016 Maison Noire Syrah

An interesting aspect of the night was that members were able to pay directly to Maison Noire. The marvels of modern technology, particularly when it comes to taking your money from you.

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South American Wine & Food Matchings, November 2019 – Cenna Lloyd – Negociants

Another great night with some lovely South American wines tasted. Must also say thank you to the committee members who prepared food matches. The combination of food with the wines gave the evening an interesting perspective.

The wines tasted with food matches are repeated below:

  • 2018 Vina Aquitina Rose (Chile)
  • 2018 Casa Marin Cartagena Sauvignon Blanc (Chile) – South American Ceviche
  • 2018 Tilia Mendoza Chardonnay (Argentina) – Brazilian Cinnamon ‘Raindrop’ Doughnuts
  • 2018 Alamos Malbec (Argentina) – Argentinian Fried Bread
  • 2015 Catena Alta Malbec (Argentina) – Red Wine Chorizo Bites
  • 2012 Queulat Cabernet Sauvignon (Chile) – Brazilian Beef Croquettes
  • 2014 Queulat Carménère (Chile) – Steak with a Chimichurri sauce

If anyone is interested in any of the recipes used on the night, let me or Wayne know. We can provide. May I just point out though, that if anyone believes it is only 5 minutes preparation time for the Argentinian Fried Bread, they are delusional.

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Villa Maria – March 2019

Yet another excellent tasting with Marc Udy from Villa Maria, ably assisted by Kirsty Warbrick,  presenting a range of great wines including some from their Platinum Range. Marc is one of the winemakers from Marlborough.  He was a good speaker and the consensus is that the winery has been really easy to deal with.

To reiterate the tasting included the Cellar Selection Rose 2018; Reserve Wairua Sauvignon 2018;  Single Vineyard Seddon Pinot Gris 2018; Reserve Marlborough Chardonnay 2016; Platinum Selection Pinot Noir 2018; Cellar Selection Grenache 2017, rounded off with the Cellar Selection Late Harvest Riesling 2015.  An enjoyable night.

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2018 Portuguese Wine & Food Tasting Recipes

Thanks to those requesting recipes from last November’s Portuguese wine & food tasting.

Pão frito (fried bread)

INGREDIENTS

  • 400 grams (14 ounces) bread cut into slices
  • 100 ml (1/2 cup) olive oil
  • 6 cloves of garlic
  • Pepper (to taste)
  • Coriander (to taste)

DIRECTIONS Put the olive oil and unpeeled crushed garlic in a frying pan and saute over low heat for about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the bread, season with pepper and chopped coriander and fry it on both sides over medium heat until golden brown. Turn off the heat and serve this delicious appetizer before the main course.

Figos, presunto e queijo de cabra (figs, ham and goat cheese)

Hands-on time 10min. Cooking time about 10 min. Makes 20. INGREDIENTS

  • 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tbsp runny honey
  • Vegetable oil, to grease
  • 5 figs, cut into quarters
  • 10 slices Parma Ham, sliced in half lengthways
  • 100g (3 1/2oz) hard Goat’s Cheese

METHOD

Preheat the oven to 200C (180C fan). Mix together the balsamic vinegar and honey together in a small bowl. Grease a baking sheet and place the figs skin side down onto it, then drizzle over the balsamic mixture carefully covering each fig. Roast for 10min. Allow to cool slightly. Cut cheese into small pieces and top each fig with a piece of cheese. Wrap each fig in a length of Parma ham. Serve at room temperature.

HINTS:

We can use Melon if figs are not in season. Can also substitute blue cheese or parmesan if you can’t get a HARD goat’s cheese Part of the joy of this dish is the balsamic vinegar pairing with the parma ham.

Camarão alho (garlic shrimps)

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 Ibs shrimp, raw and peeled, no tails
  • 1/2 cup margarine (or butter)
  • 6 garlic cloves, fresh and crushed
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine (can use white cooking wine)
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 lemon (need about 1 1/2 oz. fresh lemon juice)

METHOD

Preheat oven to 350 degrees For two pounds of raw, peeled shrimp, saute one stick margarine (I use butter) with six cloves of crushed garlic, slowly on low heat, do not burn the garlic! Then add 1/2 Cup dry white wine (can use cooking wine), 1/2 Crushed Red Pepper, 1/2 oz. Fresh Lemon Juice Place raw, peeled shrimp in a 21/2 quart casserole dish and pour the sauce over the shrimp, cover and bake 20 minutes You’re done! Serve over yellow or white rice or alone with plenty of bread

HINTS

2lb is almost a kilo of shrimps, although I would use peeled and tailed prawns – but frozen from the supermarket. 350 degrees is a fraction under 180 C Bring in a dish that we can warm in the oven and then spoon out into the serving dishes and send out with toothpicks

Bolas de frango com molho de piri piri (chicken balls with a piri piri sauce)

Suggest you go to the supermarket and buy pre-made chicken balls and a bottle of Nando’s Peri-Peri Sauce. Then simply fry the chicken balls in a ½ inch of oil heated medium-high
Turn occasionally to ensure browned and cooked through, about 8 minutes. Transfer chicken balls to bowl. Add sauce and toss until covered then serve with toothpicks.

Carne vinho d’alhos (beef in a wine and garlic marinade)

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 to4 clove fresh garlic
  • 1 Tbsp Portuguese paprika [I used smoked]
  • 1 tsp coarse salt or to taste
  • 6 black peppercorns
  • 1 Tbsp Portuguese olive oil
  • 1 c red (or white wine or equal amounts of both.
  • 1 Tbsp fresh minced crushed red pepper.

METHOD

Using your chef knife (or any knife smash the garlic cloves and finely chopped. ADD all dry ingredients one at a time. BLENDING well, drizzle in 1 tablespoon olive oil .  Then RUB the meat with the spices mixture and place in a nonreactive dish. POUR the wine over the meat to partially or entirely cover it, depending on the recipe. MARINATE the meat, turning occasionally, for several hours. It’s best to marinade overnight in the refrigerator or even 24 hrs for better results

HINTS:

For the meat, I used Rump Steak which marinated well. Sirloin would also have been OK. Be sure to pat dry before grilling or frying else you risk poaching the steak because of the excess marinade liquid. I used the BBQ which gave an extra smokiness. Watch your cooking time as it will vary depending upon the thickness of the steak. I had the plate super hot and did just under 2 mins a side. For one of the thinner pieces, it was about 90 secs a side. If not sure, I suggest trying a small sample first. The aim is for a hint of pink in the middle but obviously one can adjust to personal tastes if doing this as a meal. Be sure to rest the steak. Slice thinly if serving as hors d-oeuvres. The dish name literally means meat in wine and garlic. More often, the recipe uses pork and white wine, but our choice is just as valid.

Confidant Wines present the wines of Portugal – Victor Kattenbelt

A great evening of Portuguese wines with food matches. The wines included:

  • Casa Santos Lima WOP (Wines of Portugal) Sparkling
  • Valcatrina Rose 2016
  • Pluma Vinho Verde
  • Casa Lima Alvarinho (Albarino)
  • Confidencial 2015 (a Portugese multi blend red)
  • Galadoro Red 2016
  • Casa Santos Lima Colossal Reserva 2015
  • Ximenez Iberian Sherry

The food matches included:

  • Pão Frite (Fried Bread)
  • Figos, presunto e queijo de cabra (figs, ham and goat cheese)
  • Camarão alho (garlic shrimps)
  • Bolas de frango com molho de piri piri (Chicken balls with Piri Piri sauce)
  • Carne vinho d’alhos (Beef in a wine and garlic marinade)
  • and by no means least Bolo de Nata (Christmas Cake).

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Negociants present Yalumba Wines – Cenna Lloyd – October 2018

This was a very enjoyable tasting. Cenna was a very knowledgeable presenter with a great relaxed style. She admitted to a few nerves to start with but was soon interacting nicely with the members. The wines presented were great wines at a good value for money. The tasting was a good night.

Whilst we haven’t used Negociants before, the fact that we are now licensed means we can deal with this type of operation in the future. We will keep it in mind to pencil Negociants in for another tasting soon, as they have a really good provider base.

To reiterate, the wines tasted were the:

  • 2017/2018 Sangiovese Rosé
  • 2017 Organic Chardonnay
  • 2014 Eden Valley Roussanne
  • 2017 Eden Valley Viognier
  • 2017 Old Bush Vine Grenache
  • 2015 Paradox Shiraz
  • 2014 The Signature Cabernet Sauvignon Shiraz

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